Content about U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

March 12, 2014

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), which amended Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, explicitly prohibits employers with at least 15 employees from sex discrimination on the basis of pregnancy. According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), an employer “may not treat a pregnant worker who is temporarily unable to perform some of her job duties because of pregnancy less favorably than workers whose job performance is similarly restricted because of conditions other than pregnancy.”

August 26, 2013

Want to convince managers to report harassment complaints swiftly?

Show them a video illustrating—in painful detail—what it’s like to sit through a deposition for a harassment lawsuit.

That’s among the training suggestions made by employment law experts now that the U.S. Supreme Court has weighed in on the circumstances under which an employee is a “supervisor” for purposes of vicarious employer liability under the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

December 6, 2012

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared to struggle over the question of who qualifies as a supervisor under federal nondiscrimination laws. Hearing oral arguments in a case from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Nov. 26, 2012, the high court addressed the issue, left unanswered in previous Supreme Court decisions, of when a “supervisor” includes an employee who oversees and directs other workers’ daily tasks, but has no authority over their formal employment status, (Vance v. Ball State Univ., No. 11-556).

November 14, 2012

Barbara Metzger learned she had breast cancer in early 2007. What happened next to the longtime office clerk was also life-altering: When she attempted to return to work, Metzger was fired.

The dismissal, detailed in documents from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), provides a cautionary tale for employers about what not to do when workers return to work from injuries or illnesses.

September 22, 2011

Mooresville, N.C.-based Lowe's has agreed to pay $120,000 to settle a religious discrimination and retaliation lawsuit over an employee who claimed he was scheduled to work on Sunday, against his wishes. 

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